ADHD drivers are at high risk. Here are 4 ways to stay safer on the road

Driving Safely With ADHD - Infographic

 

Handing any teenager the keys to a vehicle can be a nerve-wracking experience, let alone a teen with ADHD.

Indeed, people of all ages with ADHD are 4 times more likely to receive a moving violation ticket, 2 times more likely to get into an accident , and 50% more likely to get into a serious accident involving injury.

Thankfully, there’s a lot we can do to minimize inattentiveness behind the wheel

Special classes exist to train people on how to become more conscious of obstacles on the road, and build instincts to drive around them in safe, accident minimizing ways. They’re called defensive driving classes, and ADHD adults and teenagers should invest in them to learn these skills on autopilot. Parents should consider making these classes mandatory in exchange for the privilege of a teenager using their vehicle.

People with ADHD need to find engaging ways to stay connected to the experience of driving. Researchers have found that adolescent teens are more attentive and conscious of the road when driving a manual transmission vehicle. This may be the perfect excuse your son has been looking for to get that manual transmission car (and this time, he may actually be right).

Who hasn’t missed a critical turn, or gone in the wrong direction for miles? With ADHD it’s likely a common occurrence. Thankfully with satellite guidance in the form of GPS, there’s no need to go down the wrong road — unconsciously — ever again. Get in the habit of putting your phone on GPS mode for trips of any length, and you’ll make a lot less of those mistakes.

Sometimes symptoms of ADHD are so severe that the best option is to hand the driving to someone else. Carpooling and public transportation are becoming more viable options in some parts of the country. They also make getting around less stressful and more enjoyable. See what options are available, and consider making it part of your own schedule.

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8 Comments on "ADHD drivers are at high risk. Here are 4 ways to stay safer on the road"

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Member
1 year 1 month ago

We have a 16-year old son with ADHD. It was hard at first to teach him how to drive our SUV, for a time I thought it wouldn’t be safe to hand him the keys one day. but with patience he got ahold of it. Although my wife and I are still considering additional driving classes for him even now.

Member
1 year 1 month ago

Personally I love driving and currently own both an automatic and manual transmission vehicle. For me, driving a manual is MUCH more involving. It really connects you to the road and the machine. I think this is very important, specially for people with ADHD.

Paschal
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Paschal
1 year 1 month ago

Well put. Such a great aticle

Joe
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Joe
1 year 1 month ago

My son has ADHD too. While it was a breeze for me to get a driver’s license, it took him 3 tests before he passed. I read somewhere in the internet that many teenagers with attention or other learning problems can become good drivers, but not easily or quickly, and that some will be better off not driving till they are older — or not at all.

Jonas Murdock
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Jonas Murdock
1 year 1 month ago

This is why my daughter with ADHD still takes the bus to school despite the fact that she is really eager to have her own car.

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